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October 2019 Health Newsletter

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Current Articles

» 2008 Estimated Cancer Statistics
» Broccoli - The Cancer Fighter
» Cancer Rates Decreasing, But Slowly
» Cancer Treatment Centers to Incorporate Chiropractic Care
» Colon Cancer On The Rise In Young Adults

» National Chiropractic Health Month: Take Steps to Better Musculoskeletal Health
» Vegetarians May Live Longer
» “BPA-Free” Plastics Potentially Worse

2008 Estimated Cancer Statistics

The American Cancer Society released their annual cancer statistics report for 2008 on February 20, 2008. According to their estimates, a staggering 1.4 million Americans will be diagnosed with cancer in 2008 and 565,650 will die from their cancer. The following graph provides some of the more notable estimated statistics for American men and women:
 

Estimated

Deaths

 

Men

Women

Number of Cancer Deaths
Lung Cancer Deaths
Colorectal Cancer Deaths
Pancreatic Cancer Deaths
Bladder/Kidney Cancer Deaths
Liver Cancer Deaths
Skin Cancer Deaths
Prostate Cancer Deaths
Breast Cancer Deaths
Ovarian Cancer Deaths
294,120
90,810
24,260
17,500
18,430
12,570
7,360
28,660
450
n/a

271,530
71,030
25,700
25,700
9,380
5,840
3,840
n/a
40,480
15,520

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Cancer Facts & Figures 2008. American Cancer Society.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2008


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Broccoli - The Cancer Fighter

What if a few servings of broccoli a week could help prevent, even fight off prostate cancer? New research indicates there may just be truth to this. A team of British researchers from the Institute of Food Research found dietary broccoli consumption of 400 grams per week activated genes that control inflammation and cancer formation in the prostate. According to researchers, when people get cancer some genes are switched off and some are switched on, and, what broccoli seems to be doing is switching on genes which prevent cancer development and switching off other genes that help it to spread. Thus, dietary broccoli consumption was able to affect the expression of cancer formation/inflammation/spreading genes in a positive manner. Prostate cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer death in men with approximately 680,000 men diagnosed worldwide.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: PLoS One. July 2, 2008.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2008


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Cancer Rates Decreasing, But Slowly

It appears that advances in cancer screenings and cancer treatments may be working as a new report indicates deaths from cancers are continuing to drop. According to the most recent American Cancer Society annual report, between 2004 and 2008 cancer death rates dropped 1.6 percent in women and 1.8 percent in men annually. Although the rate drops are small, they are significant and a good sign as rates have continually dropped each year over the last 10 years. As good as this news is, it's still projected that more than 1.6 million people will be diagnosed with cancer and close to 600K individuals will die from cancer this year alone within the United States.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Cancer Statistics, 2012; Cancer Facts & Figures 2012. American Cancer Society.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2012


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Cancer Treatment Centers to Incorporate Chiropractic Care

Groundbreaking, Integrated Approach to Treatment Demonstrates Commitment to Patient-centered Care—Arlington, Va.—The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) today announced that Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA)—a pioneer in integrative care, incorporating chiropractic services and other supportive therapies into its advanced, evidenced-based cancer treatments—is the focus of the cover story in the August 2013 issue of ACA News. At CTCA's five regional hospitals, chiropractic physicians work on teams alongside surgeons and oncologists to support cancer patients during their treatment. Its patient-centered approach came from a simple question, "If your mother had cancer, how would you want her to be treated?" CTCA's founder, Richard J. Stephenson, lost his mother to cancer and wished that her treatment had been more focused on providing comprehensive care in addition to the advanced treatment options she needed. Chiropractic physicians joined CTCA's staff 10 years ago (due to patient demand), allowing its hospitals to offer truly comprehensive, integrated treatment under one roof. If a patient complains about a headache due to a new chemotherapy drug, his or her treatment team might first suggest the patient try a chiropractic adjustment as opposed to going on yet another medication. According to Jeffrey Sklar, DC, eastern regional director in the department of chiropractic at CTCA, "We are not treating cancer, we are treating patients with cancer; it is whole-person care. And that is what got me turned on about chiropractic to begin with." CTCA's model has influenced the way oncologists, surgeons and other clinicians around the country think about treating cancer patients. Whole-person cancer treatment combined with a compassionate, nurturing environment—known as the Mother Standard of Care—provides patients with much needed support during treatment. "I applaud CTCA as an institution for its dedication to treating the whole patient by offering therapy aimed at combating the difficult side-effects of grueling cancer treatments, as well as the cancer itself," said ACA President Keith Overland, DC. "I am truly inspired by my colleagues at CTCA, who are making a real difference in the quality of life for people undergoing cancer treatment."

Author: American Chiropractic Association
Source: American Chiropractic Association, online July 31, 2013.
Copyright: American Chiropractic Association 2013


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Colon Cancer On The Rise In Young Adults


Colon and rectal cancers are increasing among younger adults, according to new research. At the same time, incidents of colon and rectal cancers in those over 50 years of age have been decreasing slightly. Researchers aren’t sure why rates are increasing among young adults, but attribute the decrease in those older adults to the increase in screening and removal of suspicious growths before they’re able to turn malignant. Should things continue on their current path, researchers believe colon and rectal cancer cases in those aged 20 to 34 years could come close to doubling in the next 15 years. For 35 to 49 year olds, those rates could increase by 28 to 46 percent.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: 
JAMA Surgery, online November 5, 2014.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2014


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National Chiropractic Health Month: Take Steps to Better Musculoskeletal Health

The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) and chiropractors nationwide are encouraging the public to take simple steps toward better musculoskeletal (MSK) health during National Chiropractic Health Month (NCHM) this October. The MSK system is comprised of the spine as well as all the muscles, bones and joints of the body. Keeping this vital system strong is the focus of 2019’s "Strength. Stability. Success." campaign.

When the MSK system functions well, we feel stronger and healthier; however, when there's a problem we might experience pain and even disability. More than one in two adults report experiencing an MSK condition such as back pain, neck pain, joint pain, arthritis or osteoporosis. They are the most commonly reported medical conditions among those under age 65 and the second most common condition for people age 65 and older. Low back pain alone is the leading cause of disability worldwide.

"Chiropractors provide care that helps people improve musculoskeletal health and relieve conditions such as low back pain naturally, sometimes enabling them to avoid or reduce the need for riskier treatments such as prescription opioid pain medications and surgery," notes ACA President Robert C. Jones, DC.

This October, set yourself up for future stability and success by taking steps to improve the strength of your musculoskeletal system:

  1. Move more. Bones, muscles and joints need movement to stay healthy. The U.S. surgeon general recommends adults get at least 150 minutes weekly of moderate physical activity (such as walking, yardwork, recreational swimming) or at least 75 minutes of intense weekly activity (jogging, hiking uphill, basketball).
  2. Eat a balanced diet. Proper nutrition is just as important to musculoskeletal health as it is to overall health. Eat a balanced diet that includes whole fresh foods and try to avoid processed foods. Be sure to get enough calcium and vitamin D for your bones and lean protein to build and maintain strong muscles.
  3. Go outside. The sun helps our bodies produce Vitamin D, which in turn helps us to absorb calcium and strengthen bones.
  4. Do weight-bearing exercises. Walking, jogging and resistance exercises such as weightlifting can improve bone density. Planks and squats can also strengthen core muscles. (Non-weight-bearing exercises such as swimming and biking can benefit the MSK system as well, especially for people unable to walk or jog while recovering from back, hip or knee pain.)
  5. Stay hydrated. Drinking water makes muscles stronger by carrying oxygen to the cells of the body. It also helps lubricate and cushion joints.
  6. Quit smoking. Smoking contributes not only to cardiovascular disease but also osteoporosis and bone fracture as we age.
  7. Get adequate rest. A good night's sleep enables your body to repair muscles and joints that are strained or injured during the day.
  8. Don’t drink too much alcohol. Drinking alcohol excessively can lead to osteoporosis and bone fracture.

We can also reduce the risk of pain and injury to our MSK system by improving our posture and movement techniques as well the ergonomics of our work and home environments. Learn more at www.acatoday.org/NCHM.

Author: American Chiropractic Association
Source: Acatoday.org. September 10, 2019.
Copyright: American Chiropractic Association 2019


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Vegetarians May Live Longer

A five year study of people's eating habits suggests that people who limit or eliminate meat from their diets are less likely to die over time. Researchers at Loma Linda University in California studied data from over 70,000 participants and found that people who eat mostly fruits and vegetables enjoyed a reduced risk of heart disease and other diet-related causes of death. In the test group, 8 percent of subjects described themselves as vegans who didn't eat any animal products, 29 percent were lacto-ovo-vegetarians who didn't eat fish or meat but did eat dairy and egg products, and 15 percent occasionally ate meat and fish. The researchers found that while seven out of 1000 individuals died in any given period of time, the death rate among vegetarians and occasional meat-eaters dropped to five or six individuals in the same time period. However, the researchers were reluctant to attribute the effect solely to the test subject's diet choices. They pointed out that the vegetarians also generally worked out more, were better educated, less likely to smoke and weighed less, all of which contributed to their decreased mortality rate. Still, they concluded that the data suggests that reducing or eliminating animal products from your diet could lead to healthier overall outcomes.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JAMA Internal Medicine, online June 3, 2013.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2013


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“BPA-Free” Plastics Potentially Worse

If you’ve purchased plastic related drinking containers you’ve surely noticed many products touting their "BPA-free" status. BPA or bisphenol-A is a chemical used to harden plastic and has received much bad press over the recent years due to studies linking it to brain and behavior issues in children and infants, altered hormone levels, obesity and cancer, to name a few. Unfortunately, new research from Canada shows the replacement being used for BPA, BPS or bisphenol-S, has now also become a cause for concern. Researchers from the University of Calgary have now found BPS to cause changes in the brain development of zebra fish embryos at extremely low doses. Authors of the study state their findings are directly relevant to humans, especially for women in their second trimester of pregnancy.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Jan 12, 2015.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2015


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